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Create great family treasures with pet photography

Elvis Elvis

Cameras and pets go together like bread and butter or peanut butter and jelly or hot dogs and mustard (you get what I mean). Pets create many, many memorable times in our lives and, if we don’t record them, they’re going to be lost, forever.

There’s a lady that bought a new camera just recently (sad but true story). She had a horse for over 30 years. She and her pet were inseparable. They were friends, buddies in fact. Her friend and pet passed away a couple of weeks ago and, in addition to the grief we all feel at the passing of a close friend, she realized she didn’t have even one photograph of her pet.

Wanna a really great picture? Get a child and a pet together in the same place at the same time…instant winner! You may not win any contests with it and that doesn’t matter. What you will have is a treasure that money can’t buy.

Barb ‘n Butch

“Butch” was a family pet for many years and he simply loved being around Barbara, the youngest member of our family. You can see his tail was wagging so hard that the shutter speed of the old 126 camera was too slow to freeze the motion.

(Hey, if you love Small Dogs, click here!)

Digital cameras, especially the higher end ones, will allow you to take multiple exposures with one push of the shutter release. The picture possibilities are endless if you have a pet that likes to play.

Create great family treasures with pet photography

The film cameras that are equipped with automatic film advance will allow you to do the same and the results can be spectacular to say the least.

It gets to be pretty easy if you take the time to pre-set the exposure and the focus before you start taking pictures. This is important if you expect good results. Take a light-meter reading to determine the base settings and then decide which kind of picture you want.

For a straight-forward portraits, about the only thing you’ll especially have to look out for is sunshine. Make sure your subjects don’t have to squint. Open shade is far better than harsh sunshine. Using flash fill can greatly soften deep shadows caused by direct sunlight if you can’t avoid it.

Remember to try and keep your subject’s back or shoulder in front of the the natural light source, not the face. Keeping the light source (the sun) off to the side will guarantee you won’t get lens flare and ruin a potentially excellent shot.

If you want to photograph your dog chasing a stick, a frizbee or something similar, you’ll have to follow one of the following suggestions. If you’re after a sharp, freeze-motion picture, you’ll need a high shutter speed. Your aperture (or f-stop) will be wider and consequently your background will be out of focus. This is normal. If you’re more intrested in showing the actual motion of the pet (which can be quite spectacular), use a slower shutter speed and a smaller aperture. Look at Butch’s tail in the above picture for example.

Only Her Hairdresser Knows For Sure

I don’t have anything current that I’ve personally shot recently but I will have and I’ll post it here as soon as I can.

I think most everyone will agree that horses are magnificent creatures. There is a certain majesty about them that always shows up in photographs. They make great photographic subjects. What’s even better is that they’re very friendly and form very strong bonds with their owners. This comes across in a properly-taken candid portrait.