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Halloween Safety Tips and Trick or Treat Safety

Elvis Elvis

Be ghoulishly safe with these Halloween safety tips.

Halloween is such a fun time for little ones. They love wearing their costumes and getting candy. My son especially loved saying: “Trick or treat, smell my feet. Give me something good to eat.”

However Halloween has had some bad press over the years. Because it is considered such a dark holiday, some unscrupulous people like doing bad things on this day.

So let us be prepared this season. Here are some Halloween tips to keep your little ones safe.

Halloween Safety Tips and Trick or Treat Safety

Dressed to a tee.

  • Consider buying costumes that are flame-retardant. That way your little ones will be safe from burning jack-o-lanterns and other possible burning hazards.
  • Keep costume length short to prevent trips and falls.
  • Use non-toxic, hypoallergenic makeup instead of masks because they can block eyesight.
  • If your little ones are going trick-or-treating (especially at night), put a reflective strip on their costumes. Don’t forget to put it on the trick-or-treat bag as well.
  • Leave the guns, swords and knife props at the store. If you just got to have them, make sure they are not real looking and flexible to prevent injury.

Trick or treat, smell my feet. Give me something good to eat.

  • A parent or responsible adult should always be with young children while they are trick-or-treating.
  • Older kids should go trick-or-treating in a group. Map out a safe route together so you’ll know where they’ll be. Also make sure you know what time they will be home.
  • Carry a cell phone just in case.
  • If trick-or-treating at night, bring a flashlight. Make sure it has fresh batteries.
  • Always walk on the sidewalk. If there is no sidewalk, walk at the far edge of the roadway facing traffic.
  • Remain on well-lit streets and do not walk down alleys.
  • Only go to familiar homes with a porch light on.

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown.

  • Small children should not carve pumpkins. Consider having them draw or trace the face.
  • You should always cut away from yourself in small, controlled strokes.
  • If illuminating a pumpkin, remember to keep dogs and cats away. They could knock them over and start a fire.

Let them eat cake.

  • Instruct your little ones not to eat their treats until they get home. That way you can check the candy to make sure it is safe to eat.
  • Remove gum, peanuts, hard candies and other choking hazards if giving some of the treats to a young child.
  • When in doubt, throw it out.

Is this too much to think about? Are you a party animal? Then forget about trick-or-treating and host a Halloween party for the little ones. It can be a lot of fun.

Another activity to consider other than trick-or-treating is Halloween festivities at a local church, mall, or community center. These activities are family oriented and provide lots of fun without the stress of worrying about your little one out there in the big, bad world.